Nerf N-Strike Elite Disruptor Review

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If you are after a decent sidearm style blaster, the Nerf N-Strike Elite Disruptor may be a good option for you.

This streamlined shooter takes the best of the older Strongarm model and switches it up with some new design features and an improved look-and-feel.

Here’s my quick blast through below on some of the key features of the Disruptor, and how it fares against the previous N-Strike model and other similar blasters.

What Is the Nerf N-Strike Elite Disruptor?

The Nerf N-Strike Elite Disruptor was released in the second half of 2016, and is a six-dart revolver style blaster. It is a small-medium sized Nerf gun, and part of the N-Strike Elite series.

Nerf N-Strike Elite Disruptor

The Disruptor is essentially a remake of the Nerf Strongarm blaster, with some key design changes. It is a single-fire blaster with the ability for slam or rapid firing, and firing capacity of 6 Elite Dart rounds. It has an advertised firing range of up to 90 feet (27 meters).

It’s a light little sidearm for some quick and fun play, and a good starter model if you don’t already have a similar blaster in your collection.

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>> Check out my review of the Nerf Rival Perses.

Top Features of the Nerf Disruptor

Here’s my take on some of the top features and characteristics of the Nerf Disruptor.

1. Lightweight Sidearm

The Disruptor is a lightweight sidearm design and looks a little more like a modern laser blaster than the Strongarm. By removing the bulky plastic design at the front of the blaster, the Disruptor looks lighter and sleeker than the Strongarm, which is just an aesthetic detail.

There is a tactical rail on top of the blaster, as well as two sling points, one built into the handle and the other below the cylinder. I don’t think you would need a sling for a blaster this size though. Slings are really only critical for longer and heavier blasters, where you need to support the weight and the balance whilst keeping your hands free to fire and prime.

The Disruptor is a sidearm blaster

The ergonomics work well for me, I find the trigger handle sits comfortably in my hand without feeling too bulky, and I’m not reaching too far with my finger to squeeze the trigger. The primer is also nice and chunky, so it’s easy to grab and slide without any fiddling around.

The blaster comes packaged with a set of 6 Elite Bullet Rounds and instructions, and at the time of writing there was an option to purchase a kit including two blasters.

2. Prime Time

The Disruptor uses a slide-action primer, very similar to the Strongarm which is located on top of the blaster at the rear. It has a large comfortable grip and slides smoothly, no issues with balancing the blaster when you have one hand on top and the other on the trigger.

This primer also has a color-coded priming indicator at the back – when you slide the primer and the indicator turns orange, you are good to start shooting.

The Nerf Disruptor has a rotating drum

One of the drawbacks (pun intended) with a slide-action primer, especially one like this which is located on the top of the gun, is that it’s not the most natural position for most people to rest their non-trigger hand, but this really comes down to personal preference.

If you already have a Strongarm you will be used to this kind of arrangement, and I personally didn’t have any issues with this in either single fire or slam-fire mode.

3. Quick Reloads

One of the key differences between the Disruptor and the Strongarm is the design of the cylinder. The front of the cylinder on the Disruptor is fully exposed for quick reloading, which is useful on a blaster that only holds 6 rounds at a time.

The Nerf Disruptor uses a slide-action primer

Some may call this out as a cost-cutting measure by Hasbro, but I prefer to look at the upside of being able to quickly slot the rounds back into the blaster.

If you are working with a Strongarm now, you will notice the difference as the cylinder doesn’t swing out on the Disruptor. The advantage the Disruptor has with its new cylinder design is that I don’t need to stop the cylinder from flopping around as I load the rounds into it either.

4. Slamming Fire

The Disruptor is a single-blaster with a solid firing distance advertised at 90 feet (27 meters). From my actual sessions, I would say that it comes pretty close to reaching this range, which is not too far off what is achievable with the newer and larger blasters.

The slam-fire function has always been one of my favorites (but maybe not so much the running around grabbing ammo of the ground directly afterward).

If you’re sneaking quickly upon someone who isn’t too far away, slam-fire is great as it allows you to quickly blow off several shots in a row by holding down the trigger and pulling the primer back each time you need to take a shot.

Nerf N-Strike Elite Disruptor
  • 6-dart rotating drum
  • Quick-draw blaster
  • Slam-fire action

Final Thoughts

The Nerf N-Strike Elite Disruptor is a good little blaster, but I probably wouldn’t call it disruptive if you have a Strongarm or another similar sidearm in your collection.

But if this style of blaster is brand new to you, there are no major downsides to the Disruptor design, and it is a little cheaper than a Strongarm.

The re-design of the cylinder makes for quick re-loading, the slide-action primer works smoothly, and overall the blaster is light and comfortable with a cool sci-fi look and feel.

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Check out my top 10 best Nerf blasters:

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ReviewNerf N-Strike Elite Disruptor
SummaryThe Nerf N-Strike Elite Disruptor is a solid little sidearm blaster, very similar to the Strongarm but with an improved design and upgraded look-and-feel.
AuthorThomas Dunnett
Rating4.4 (out of 5)
 
Thomas Dunnett

I'm a huge fan of Nerf blasters, home laser tag, and other real-life action games that keep us active, social and young at heart.

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